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Showing posts with label Birth control. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Birth control. Show all posts

2 Types Of Birth Control Methods Men Can Use To Prevent Them From Impregnating A Woman

 Birth Control is a form of family planning method used to prevent pregnancy and to control the number of children couples would wish to have. This article centres on the birth control methods that men could undertake so as to avoid impregnating a woman.


Most times, couples who are into intimate relationships may wish to engage in lovemaking without making babies, using any of the different birth control methods will prevent pregnancy during the act.



2 Types Of Birth Control Methods Men Can Use To Prevent Them From Impregnating A Woman


Women are known to have been using different methods to prevent pregnancy over the years, this includes the use of;

- Oral contraceptives

- Barrier methods

- Surgical sterilization, etc.


These methods can be either temporary or permanent depending on the choice of the partners involved. The aim is to alter the way the female body works in other to prevent pregnancy.

BIRTH CONTROL METHODS FOR MEN


The 2 basic methods currently available for men are;

1) Condom

2) Vasectomy

CONDOM

This is a thin fitted tube that is worn over the male reproductive organ before engaging in the act. It serves as a barrier device that prevents pregnancy and STDs. They are often easy to use and can be bought over the counter.



When the condom is used correctly, it is safe and effective.

2 Types Of Birth Control Methods Men Can Use To Prevent Them From Impregnating A Woman


VASECTOMY


This is a surgical procedure whereby the vas deferens which are tubes that carry the male reproductive cells are being cut off, tied or sealed so as to prevent the male cells from passing through the urethra.


Vasectomy is a permanent birth control method for men that cannot be reversed. Men prefer this method if they do not want to father any more children.

Since this is an irreversible method, couples who wish to use it, need to properly discuss and consider the implications involved so as to avoid future regrets.

JPeei Clinic 

Can Birth Control Pills Cause Infertility?

 While birth control pills don't affect your fertility, they play an important role in your menstrual cycle. Here's what you need to know before trying to conceive.

Can Birth Control Pills Cause Infertility?


If you're not actively trying to conceive, you might decide to take hormonal contraception—often in the form of birth control pills. Some women fear that taking the pills will interfere with future attempts to get pregnant, but thankfully, experts say that's not the case. "Birth control pills do not have a negative impact on fertility," says Eric Strand, M.D., a Washington University OB-GYN at the Women & Infants Center in St. Louis.



Here's everything you need to know about how birth control can affect your fertility, including how long it takes to get pregnant once you stop taking the pills.

Birth Control Doesn't Cause Infertility


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) defines infertility as the inability to get pregnant after one year (or longer) of having regular unprotected sex. If you're over the age of 35, the definition changes to six months of unsuccessful attempts at pregnancy. A number of conditions can lead to infertility in women, like hypothyroidism and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Birth control isn't listed as a cause. In the vast majority of cases, your cycle will return to normal almost immediately after stopping the pill.


"Birth control pills regulate periods because they suppress the natural cycle (rather than permanently alter it)," says Iris Insogna, M.D., of Columbia University Fertility Center. "The exposure to estrogen and progesterone in the first three weeks, followed by the withdrawal of the hormones in the fourth week, is what causes regular monthly periods when you are on birth control pills."

Dr. Strand agrees, saying, "Any irregularity in menstrual cycles after the use of [the pill] is likely from pre-existing conditions that were masked during the patient's use of the pill."


What's more, scientific research has found no link between oral contraceptives and infertility. Take a 2013 study of 3,727 Danish women between the ages of 18 and 40. "Although OC (oral contraceptive) use was associated with a transient delay in the return of fertility, we found no evidence that long-term OC use deleteriously affects fecundability," or the ability to get pregnant," according the study published in Human Reproduction.

How Stopping Birth Control Affects Your Menstrual Cycle



After you stop taking birth control, the hormones will leave your system, causing your body to take over and revert to a natural menstrual cycle. And this happens relatively fast: "The hormones (associated with oral contraceptives) only stay in your body for a short time, which is why you need to take the pill regularly to avoid a contraceptive failure," says Dr. Strand.


In other words, you should expect your cycle to return to normal soon after stopping birth control. "For some women it can take a little time, typically not more than a few weeks, for the (menstrual cycle) to start functioning again after discontinuing the birth control pill," says Dr. Insogna. "This isn't always the case, however. It's important to remember that some women will ovulate and resume regular periods almost instantly after stopping the birth control pill."

Injectable birth control options, like Depo Provera, can cause things to take a bit longer to get back to normal. "Although the Depo shot is given every three months, it can take six to 12 months (and in rare cases even longer) for a patient's menstrual cycle to return," says Dr. Strand.

Getting Pregnant After Birth Control


When it comes to getting pregnant after stopping the pill, it's possible as soon as your cycle returns. Some women get pregnant immediately, which is why most OB-GYNs recommend waiting until you're truly ready before stopping contraceptive use. In other cases, things can take a bit longer.


"Remember, it can take several months for a patient to achieve a pregnancy under normal circumstances," Strand says. "In a healthy couple with no known fertility problems, approximately 40 to 50 percent will be pregnant after three months of unprotected intercourse," but this doesn't mean the couple is experiencing infertility related to birth control pills.


JPeei Clinic 

6 Things That can Stop Pill (Contraceptive) From Working

Things That Can Stop The Pill (Contraceptive) From Working


The pill is one of the most commonly used forms of birth control. Oral hormonal contraceptives when used correctly are effective in preventing unplanned pregnancies. The last thing you want when you’re on a contraceptive is to somehow by some advanced witchcraft end up pregnant.


This failure is even worse when you’re on it likely dealing with a wide range of side effects including but not limited to nausea, irregular periods, headaches, sore or tender breasts, bloating, changes to your skin, and mood swings. Here are some things to avoid because of their potential to stop this oral contraceptive from working or make it less effective.


Things that can compromise the working of the pill


Medication


Some medicines can reduce the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. Certain antibiotics known as enzyme-inducing can increase the enzymes in the body thus affecting hormonal contraception. Most antibiotics are safe to use with the ones linked to failure being rifampicin and rifabutin which are commonly used to treat tuberculosis and meningitis.


Certain epilepsy medications taken to prevent seizures and migraine medication can also affect the working of hormonal birth control. Laxatives can also compromise the functioning of the contraceptive pill. Speak to your doctor about any medication you may be on when getting treatment.

Digestive problems


Illnesses like inflammatory bowel disease and other digestive issues including vomiting can compromise the effectiveness of the pill. Bowel conditions like Crohn’s disease and inflammatory bowel disease may prevent the body from absorbing any oral medication correctly. Chronic diarrhoea can also impede absorption. Vomiting because of a stomach infection, food poisoning, or disorder like bulimia can also reduce the effectiveness of the contraceptive pill.


Detox tea and diet tablets

Detox tea usually is a combination of herbal components intended to help the body cleanse toxins from the body. It is often used as a health supplement in conjunction with weight loss efforts. Detox teas with a laxative effect compromise the pill’s efficiency. One detox tea manufacturer recently issued a statement saying, “its efficiency could be affected if you take your pill in the morning within four hours of the laxative effect.” Diet tablets also have a laxative property.


Missing a pill or starting a pack late


The leading cause of the contraceptive pill failure is that women are not taking them daily. Missing a pill is the biggest mistake you could make. One obstetrics and gynaecology professor had this to say, “For most pills, if you are in the middle or toward the end of your pack you should be fine, but if it is the first day of active pills and you forget to restart, this might be a problem… If you miss a single pill other than the first one, take it as soon as you remember, and you should be fine. If you miss more than two pills, “it is likely best to consider yourself not protected.”


Not taking the progestin-only pill at the same time daily


If you are taking progestin-only pills (POP) also known as mini-pills, timing is crucial. Progestin-only pills work mostly by making cervical mucous unfavourable for sperm. The active ingredient only stays in the body for 24 hours, so you have to take the pill at the same time every single day. If you are late by three hours or more, you should use a secondary form of birth control because that is enough time for the mucous to be penetrated. Planned parenthood recommends you use backup contraception for 48 hours after a late or missed pill.


Extreme temperatures


Like other medications, you should keep your pills away from extreme temperatures. Keeping them in very hot or very cold temperatures can risk making them less effective


See The Best Ways To Use Morning-After-Pill 


JPeei Clinic

How Taking Birth Control Can Affect Cramping

 Overview

Although some women report cramping as a side effect of birth control pills, the pills typically help to reduce or eliminate period pain. When cramping occurs, it’s usually temporary and related to hormone changes.

Learn why this happens and what you can do about it.

Most birth control pills are combination pills. This means that they contain synthetic forms of the female hormones estrogen and progesterone.

These hormones help stop pregnancy by preventing ovulation, the development and release of an egg from your ovaries. The hormones also thicken your cervical mucus, making it more difficult for sperm to reach an egg. The lining of the uterus is also altered to prevent implantation.

The minipill only contains progestin, a synthetic form of progesterone. It also stops ovulation, alters the cervical mucus, and changes the uterine lining.

Taking your pills properly not only helps prevent pregnancy but can also help keep cramps at bay. If you miss pills or take them late, hormone levels may change and trigger breakthrough bleeding and mild cramping.

While some women only experience occasional menstrual cramping, others experience debilitating cramps every period.

Menstrual cramps are triggered by the secretion of prostaglandins from glands in the uterus. Prostaglandins are also the hormones that trigger uterine contractions. The higher your levels of this hormone, the more severe your menstrual cramps will be.

Birth control pills may be prescribed to help relieve painful menstrual cramping.

According to a literature review published by Cochrane Library in 2009, birth control pills are thought to reduce the amount of prostaglandins. This, in turn, is said to reduce blood flow and cramping. The pills also suppress ovulation, which prevents any related cramping.

randomized controlled trial found that combination birth control pills taken cyclically, or 21 days on and seven days off, and those taken continually were both effective in treating primary menstrual pain.

Still, taking seven days off may lead to breakthrough bleeding and associated cramping. Taking the pills continuously offers better results in the short term.

Cramping may also be the result of an underlying medical condition. Conditions that cause painful menstrual cramping include:

Most women adjust to birth control pills with few side effects. Side effects that may occur include:

Less common side effects of the birth control pill include:

Although some women report mood swings and depression while taking birth control pills, research hasn’t established a definite link.

Progestin-only pills are thought to have fewer side effects than combination pills.

Before using birth control pills to relieve cramps, you may want to try nonhormonal treatments such as:

Most women experience little to no cramping while taking birth control pills. Some have mild cramping for a cycle or two as their bodies adjust to hormone changes, but this often decreases or stops completely.

Call your doctor if you have sudden or severe cramping or pelvic pain. This is especially true if the pain or cramping is accompanied by:

  • bleeding
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • dizziness
  • a fever

These may be symptoms of ectopic pregnancy or a ruptured ovarian cyst.

A Chinese study found that birth control failure increases the risk of ectopic pregnancy. There’s also an increased risk of ovarian cysts while taking progestin-only pills.

It’s possible to get cramps on birth control, especially in the first cycle or so. For most women, however, birth control pills ease cramping or stop it altogether. When they’re taken properly, birth control pills shouldn’t cause cramping or make it worse.

You should talk to your doctor if you experience persistent or severe cramping.

JPeei Clinic

How Taking Birth Control Can Affect Cramping

 Overview

Although some women report cramping as a side effect of birth control pills, the pills typically help to reduce or eliminate period pain. When cramping occurs, it’s usually temporary and related to hormone changes.

Learn why this happens and what you can do about it.

Most birth control pills are combination pills. This means that they contain synthetic forms of the female hormones estrogen and progesterone.

These hormones help stop pregnancy by preventing ovulation, the development and release of an egg from your ovaries. The hormones also thicken your cervical mucus, making it more difficult for sperm to reach an egg. The lining of the uterus is also altered to prevent implantation.

The minipill only contains progestin, a synthetic form of progesterone. It also stops ovulation, alters the cervical mucus, and changes the uterine lining.

Taking your pills properly not only helps prevent pregnancy but can also help keep cramps at bay. If you miss pills or take them late, hormone levels may change and trigger breakthrough bleeding and mild cramping.

While some women only experience occasional menstrual cramping, others experience debilitating cramps every period.

Menstrual cramps are triggered by the secretion of prostaglandins from glands in the uterus. Prostaglandins are also the hormones that trigger uterine contractions. The higher your levels of this hormone, the more severe your menstrual cramps will be.

Birth control pills may be prescribed to help relieve painful menstrual cramping.

According to a literature review published by Cochrane Library in 2009, birth control pills are thought to reduce the amount of prostaglandins. This, in turn, is said to reduce blood flow and cramping. The pills also suppress ovulation, which prevents any related cramping.

randomized controlled trial found that combination birth control pills taken cyclically, or 21 days on and seven days off, and those taken continually were both effective in treating primary menstrual pain.

Still, taking seven days off may lead to breakthrough bleeding and associated cramping. Taking the pills continuously offers better results in the short term.

Cramping may also be the result of an underlying medical condition. Conditions that cause painful menstrual cramping include:

  • Endometriosis. Endometriosis is a condition in which the lining of the uterus implants outside the uterus. Learn more about it here.
  • Fibroids. Fibroids are noncancerous growths in the uterine wall.
  • Adenomyosis. In this condition, the lining of the uterus grows into the uterine muscle wall.
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). This pelvic infection is often caused by sexually transmitted infections (STIs).
  • Cervical stenosis. Not to be confused with cervical spinal stenosis, this is a narrowing of the opening of the cervix. This narrowing obstructs menstrual flow.

Most women adjust to birth control pills with few side effects. Side effects that may occur include:

  • headaches
  • irregular periods, which may or may not be accompanied by cramping
  • nausea
  • enlarged breasts
  • breast pain
  • weight loss or gain

Less common side effects of the birth control pill include:

  • blood clots
  • heart attack
  • stroke

Although some women report mood swings and depression while taking birth control pills, research hasn’t established a definite link.

Progestin-only pills are thought to have fewer side effects than combination pills.

Before using birth control pills to relieve cramps, you may want to try nonhormonal treatments such as:

  • taking over-the-counter (OTC) pain relievers, such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen
  • placing a hot water bottle or heating pad on your pelvic area to relax muscles
  • taking a warm bath
  • performing gentle exercises, such as yoga or Pilates

Most women experience little to no cramping while taking birth control pills. Some have mild cramping for a cycle or two as their bodies adjust to hormone changes, but this often decreases or stops completely.

Call your doctor if you have sudden or severe cramping or pelvic pain. This is especially true if the pain or cramping is accompanied by:

  • bleeding
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • dizziness
  • a fever

These may be symptoms of ectopic pregnancy or a ruptured ovarian cyst.

A Chinese study found that birth control failure increases the risk of ectopic pregnancy. There’s also an increased risk of ovarian cysts while taking progestin-only pills.

It’s possible to get cramps on birth control, especially in the first cycle or so. For most women, however, birth control pills ease cramping or stop it altogether. When they’re taken properly, birth control pills shouldn’t cause cramping or make it worse.

You should talk to your doctor if you experience persistent or severe cramping.

JPeei Clinic

Is There a Limit to How Long You Can Take Birth Control Pills?


is There a Limit to How Long You Can Take Birth Control Pills?


 Overview

Birth control pills are convenient and effective for many people. But maybe you’ve wondered whether it’s good for your body to be taking birth control pills for a long time.

Read on to learn whether there’s a limit to how long you can take birth control pills and what to keep in mind.

Birth control pills contain small doses of hormones for preventing pregnancy. There are two basic types of birth control pills.

Minipills

One type of pill only contains the hormone progestin. It’s sometimes referred to as the “minipill.”

It works by thickening your cervical mucus and thinning the lining of your uterus, known as the endometrium.

A thicker layer of mucus makes it harder for sperm to reach and fertilize the egg. A thinner endometrium makes it harder for a fertilized embryo to become implanted and grow during pregnancy.

Combination pills

A more common type of birth control pill contains both progestin and estrogen. This is called the combination pill.

The estrogen helps keep your ovaries from releasing an egg into your fallopian tube, which is where it can become fertilized by a sperm, or to shed along with the lining of your uterus during your next period.

If you’ve been taking birth control pills for some time and have had no side effects, it’s likely that you can continue using them for as long as you need them and as long as your healthcare provider deems it’s still a safe choice.

For most healthy people, birth control pills are safe for long-term use. There are exceptions, of course. Not everyone has the same experience with birth control pills.

Progestin-only pills are appropriate for all nonsmokers. However, when it comes to those who smoke, the pills are only appropriate for those under 35.

Once you reach 35, discuss birth control options with your healthcare provider. Progestin-only pills may no longer be the best choice for you.

If you smoke, you must find another method of birth control to lower your risk for complications. If you don’t smoke and are over 35, you and your healthcare provider can decide what’s best for you.

Combination pills are generally safe for nonsmokers of any age. But those who smoke should avoid combination pills regardless of age. Estrogen increases the risk of blood clots.

Get regular checkups with your gynecologist and talk about how you’re tolerating your birth control pills.

It’s also important to renew and fill your prescription before you run out. As a long-term birth control method, birth control pills require consistent use. Take your birth control pills exactly as prescribed.

Using them for a few months, stopping for a month or two, and then starting to use them again raises your risk for an unplanned pregnancy.

Missing a dose once in a while usually isn’t a problem. Take two the next day when you remember. However, this does raise your risk for accidental pregnancy. If you find yourself forgetting to take your pill every day, it may not be the right birth control method for you.

Keep in mind that birth control pills don’t protect against sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Use condoms along with the pill.

Buy now: Shop for condoms.

During the first few months of using birth control pills, you may have some minor bleeding between periods. This is called breakthrough bleeding. It’s more common if you’re taking progestin-only pills.

It typically stops on its own, but report it to your healthcare provider if it happens, along with any other side effects.

Taking birth control pills may lead to breast tenderness and nausea for some people. You may be able to reduce these side effects by taking your pill before bedtime.

Try to take your pill at the same time every day, particularly if you use a progestin-only pill

If you experience no problems during your first year of taking birth control pills, you can probably continue using them without issue for many years.

Here are some possible side effects.

Cancer

One common concern about long-term use of birth control pills is how it affects your cancer risk.

According to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), using birth control pills may slightly lower your risk for endometrial and ovarian cancers.

Long-term use may slightly increase your risk for breast, liver, and cervical cancers. If these cancers run in your family, be sure to tell your healthcare provider and discuss your risks.

Blood clots and heart attack

The long-term use of birth control pills also slightly raises your risk for developing blood clots and heart attack after the age of 35. The risk is higher if you also have:

  • high blood pressure
  • a history of heart disease
  • diabetes

After 35, it’s important to reevaluate your options for birth control with your healthcare provider.

Smoking also worsens these health concerns.

Migraines

If you have a history of migraines, the estrogen in combination pills may make them worse.

However, you may also experience no changes in headache intensity. If your migraines are associated with your menstrual period, you may even find that birth control pills ease the pain.

Mood and libido

For some women, taking birth control pills can cause changes in mood or libido. However, these types of changes are uncommon.

Birth control pills are powerful drugs that require a prescription. Your healthcare provider should only prescribe them if your medical history and current health suggest they’ll be safe and effective. If you’re healthy, you should be able to take birth control pills with few side effects or problems.

If you’ve already tried birth control pills and experienced unpleasant side effects, talk with your healthcare provider about your experiences.

Try to remember what type of pill you took previously. Chances are a different type of pill may allow you to use birth control pills without experiencing your earlier side effects.

Smoking

If you smoke or have heart disease or other cardiovascular conditions, you may not be an ideal candidate for birth control pills.

Generally speaking, women who smoke can use birth control pills effectively. As you reach your mid-30s and beyond, smoking while on the pill puts you at higher risk for complications.

Smoking can lower the effectiveness of estrogen in combination pills. Smoking also increases your risk for heart disease, blood clots, and cancer.

Obesity

Birth control pills can sometimes be slightly less effective for women who are obese. If you’re obese, talk to your healthcare provider about whether pills are your best option.

If you’re looking for alternative long-term birth control options, you may want to consider an intrauterine device (IUD). Depending on the type of IUD you choose, it may last for anywhere from 3 to 10 years.

Most people can also use male and female condoms without problems. They also help prevent STI transmission, which birth control pills don’t do.

Natural birth control options include the rhythm method. In this method, you carefully monitor your menstrual cycle and either avoid sex or use condoms or other barrier methods during your fertile days.

Some couples also practice the withdrawal method. In this method, the penis is pulled away from the vagina before ejaculating.

Both the rhythm and withdrawal methods carry a higher risk of unplanned pregnancy than birth control pills or other contraceptive methods. There’s also a higher risk of contracting STIs.

Unless you’re trying to get pregnant or you’ve reached menopause, birth control pills might be a good option. Depending on the type of birth control pill you use, you’re protected from pregnancy after 7 to 10 days of starting to take it.

Do your research and talk with your healthcare provider. If you have a sexual partner, talk to them about your birth control use.

If you think it’s appropriate, you can also talk with family members and friends. However, keep in mind that another’s experience with birth control pills or any other form of contraceptives won’t necessarily be the same as your experience.

The right birth control choice for you is the one that fits your lifestyle and health needs.

Assuming you’re healthy, long-term use of birth control pills should have no adverse impact on your health. Taking a break now and then appears to have no medical benefit.

Long-term birth control use generally doesn’t harm your ability to get pregnant and have a healthy baby once you no longer take it.

Your regular menstrual cycle will probably return within a month or two after you stop taking your pills. Many people get pregnant within a few months of stopping birth control pills and have healthy, complication-free pregnancies.

JPeei Clinic